Posts Categorized: Research

Costa Rica | STREAMS NSF-LTREB

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Initiated by Pringle, as a postdoc in 1986, the STREAMS Long-Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) Project examines how ground- and surface-water interactions affect stream ecosystem ecology. This project has resulted in over 60 publications on tropical stream ecology and biogeochemistry. Emergent patterns in our long-term (25+ years) stream chemistry data have led us to our current focus on ecological effects of climate-driven acidification. Read more…

Puerto Rico | Luquillo NSF-LTER

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The Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Project is focused on understanding factors driving long-term ecological change in montane forest ecosystems of the El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. We have been working in El Yunque since 1989 and our lab’s contributions include (a) quantifying effects of native faunal assemblages (fishes and shrimps) on stream ecosystem properties and processes; (b) studies of shrimp migration and genetics; (c) long-term measurements of algal standing crop at the stream reach scale; (d) developing water budgets for El Yunque National Forest; (e) assessing losses in stream connectivity in response to increased water withdrawals; and (f) quantifying effects of dams on stream communities and ecosystem processes. Read more…

North Carolina | Coweeta NSF-LTER

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The Coweeta Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Project is based out of the Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory (2185 ha) located in the Nantahala National Forest of the southern Appalachians. The Coweeta LTER was first funded in 1980 and is one of the six original sites in the US LTER network. It is based on a collaborative agreement between the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, and the USDA Forest Service Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in North Carolina. Read more…

Rainforest Alliance | UGA Pringle Lab Partnership

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The Rainforest Alliance (RA) is an international non-profit organization that promotes sustainable livelihoods worldwide. We are collaborating with the RA to evaluate the effectiveness of its certification strategy which is designed to protect streams draining RA-certified agricultural enterprises. Our main goal is to assist RA in the implementation of environmental conservation criteria that will ensure the long-term success of their certification initiative in protecting stream biointegrity. This project will also increase understanding of how best management practices (related to RA certification strategies) actually work at protecting water resources in high-elevation humid tropical areas. Read more…

Georgia | Freshwater Research on Georgia’s Coastal Plain

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In collaboration with Dr. George Vellidis (UGA Tifton Agricultural Station), our lab has been doing research, on streams draining southern Georgia’s coastal plain, since the early 1990s. Our early work was on the biogeochemical drivers and ecological consequences of low dissolved oxygen levels in coastal plain streams. The most common freshwater impairment on the coastal plain of Georgia is low dissolved oxygen (DO). The majority of water body segments listed on the 2004 303(d) list in the coastal plain of Georgia were in violation of DO standards established by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. In fact, the highest percentage of DO-impaired streams in the US occurred in the southern coastal plain of Georgia. Read more…

Trinidad | From Genes to Ecosystems

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Ecological-evolutionary dynamics was the theme of this large collaborative project, funded by NSF’s Frontiers in Integrative Biology (FIBR) Program from 2007-2013. (Our lab’s continued work in Trinidad was funded by an NSF Dissertation Award to UGA PhD student, Troy Simon.) While ecological processes are known to drive adaptive evolution, the feedback from adaptive evolution to ecological processes has been explored only in theory and simple model systems. These explorations suggest a potentially profound importance for the feedback from evolution to ecological processes. Read more…

Panama | Tropical Amphibian Declines (TADS)

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The TADS (Tropical Amphibian Declines) Project is a long-term collaborative project (funded by the NSF for 13 yrs) that is examining both the short- and long-term consequences of the disease-driven extinction of an entire species assemblage of stream-dwelling frogs in Panama. Quantifying and predicting the ecological consequences of declining biodiversity is an urgent challenge, particularly in freshwater ecosystems where species declines and losses are among the highest. Read more…